Joan Campbell M.B.E.Print Page Print this page

A bronze sculptural project celebrating ceramic artist, the late Joan Campbell (1925-1997), unveiled at her beloved Bathers’ Beach workshop, Fremantle, now more commonly known as Kidogo Art House.

This project was initiated by small group of Joan’s close friends and colleagues in consultation with members of her family and community. The sculptural project, designed by Fremantle designer Catriona Gregg, references a work, Shield Form IV, from her last exhibition, Crescendo, Lawrence Wilson Gallery UWA 1997 along with some of her thoughts on the inspiration she gained from working next to the marine environment.

Joan’s work is exhibited all over the world and her art can be seen within universities, public open spaces and buildings and in many private collections and galleries including the permanent collection of the Art Gallery of Western Australia. Widely acknowledged as one of Australia’s outstanding ceramic artists and an extraordinary human being - she established a studio at the old Kerosene Store Building on the shore of Bathers’ Beach. In the opinion of many who knew her, she brought to the City of Fremantle and its citizens a re-affirmation of what she and her city stood for, integrity, honesty and creativity.


Address:Mews Road , Bathers Beach , Fremantle, 6160
GPS Coordinates:Lat: -32.057655
Long: 115.741641
Note: GPS Coordinates are approximate.
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Monument Type:Monument
Monument Theme:People
Monument Designer:Catriona Gregg


Actual Monument Dedication Date:Sunday 18th August, 2013
Front Inscription

“I have always lived within the sight and sound of the sea and for most of my life it has played an important part. The sound of the sea has almost nurtured me more than the sight of the sea. There is a wonderful rhythm on the beach, there is freshness. My studio on Bathers Beach looks out onto the sea and I can hear the moods of the sea. I hear different energies being played. I know that when I am gone the sea will still be there in continual motion. The sea humbles me constantly. It is a pacifier, a source of equanimity, at times it can rage and get angry, it has all those moods and many more”

Joan Campbell 1997

Source: MA
Monument details supplied by Monument Australia - www.monumentaustralia.org.au
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