Queensland`s 150th Anniversary Print Page Print this page

Statue of a miner commemorates Queensland's 150th birthday in 2009 and acknowledges the long history and contribution of the mining industry in Mount Perry.

On June 6, 1859, Queen Victoria signed letters patent allowing the state to separate from New South Wales. It had been suggested the new state be Cooksland, after Captain James Cook, but the Queen decided on Queensland instead.

Mining activity began in the 1860s. The discovery of rich copper deposits led to a boom as news of the strike spread. In its heyday, Mount Perry boasted some 25 hotels. These did not last, and by 1876 the town had settled down to six regular hostelries. As the land was cleared for mining operations, it spawned another industry - timber, which was used by the mines and for housing. Good stands of pine, cedar and hardwoods attracted many timber getters who used their horse and bullock teams to snig out and haul the logs that had been cut from the ranges.

Traces of gold had been found since early settlement but for years the main mining income came from copper ore. Copper mining ceased in 1913, however the remains of smelters can still be seen today. The first gold was found on "Swindon" cattle station at Mt Rawdon.



Address:Gin Gin - Mount Perry Road (Heusman Street) , Maynard Park , Mount Perry , 4671
GPS Coordinates:Lat: -25.175479
Long: 151.641892
Note: GPS Coordinates are approximate.
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Monument Type:Sculpture
Monument Theme:Government
Approx. Event Start Date:1859
Approx. Event End Date:2009


Approx. Monument Dedication Date:2009
Source: MA
Monument details supplied by Monument Australia - www.monumentaustralia.org.au
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