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Grave of James Graham Goodenough (1830-1875), naval officer. 

James Graham Goodenough CB CMG (3 December 1830 – 20 August 1875) was an officer in the Royal Navy who went to become Commander-in-Chief, Australia Station.

He served as Commander-in-Chief, Australia Station from 1873 and died aboard HMS Pearl off the coast of Australia from wounds inflicted from poisoned arrows in an attack by natives of the Santa Cruz Islands.

St Thomas' Cemetery, where the body is interred, is not attached to the church grounds, but is about a mile away in West-street . Here, towards the rear of the burial ground, is the allotment, surrounded by a chain supported on crossed anchors on a stone coping. This grave Is kept neat and clean, and is a marked contrast to many others there. It contains three graves, the centre, Commodore Goodenough`s, and the sides two gallant young seamen. These graves and the simple inscription on the sides of the monument, bear eloquent testimony to his thought and consideration for others' feelings. They had been wounded at the same time, and when he knew that they, like himself, were dying, he insisted that they should be buried, one on either side. Their names were Frederick Small, l8, Edmund Raynor, l8.

The memorial or monument is a simple encircled cross of marble, standing on a freestone base. The words "Santa Cruz" are on the bar within the circle. Around the foot of the cross has been inscribed the Commodore's favourite text during his illness, "God is love, with whom there is no variableness, neither shadow of turning. "  At the base of the pedestal we have these rather remarkable words "In his last days God was abundantly glorified, having revealed Himself to His servant in great love, his death was a triumphant victory. "  A marble slab beneath the cross gives in brief the circumstances leading up to his death.
A TRAGIC END
"Born at Guildford, Surrey, died 20th August, 1876, at sea, on board her Majesty's ship Pearl, from arrow wounds received on 12th August of the same year, at Carlisle Bay, In the Island of Santa Cruz, which he was visiting for the purpose of establishing friendly relations with the natives, who, not knowing what they did, killed their truest friend. He sailed away to die, refusing to allow a single life to be taken in retaliation. " On the rear we have "Erected by his wife, and the officers and crew of H M S Pearl " And, added later "Victoria H Goodenough, Fell asleep 29th Jan, 1917." 
Excerpt from The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW), 30 April 1932.

Location

Address:West Street, St Thomas` Cemetery Rest Park, Crows Nest, 2065
State:NSW
Area:Foreign
GPS Coordinates:Lat: -33.823761
Long: 151.206433
Note: GPS Coordinates are approximate.
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Details

Monument Type:Grave
Monument Theme:Government
Sub-Theme:Imperial
Actual Event STart Date:12-August-1875
Actual Event End Date:20-August-1875

Dedication

Approx. Monument Dedication Date:1876
Front Inscription

 (Cross & pedestal) 

SANTA CRUZ

God is love with whom there is no variableness, neither shadow of turning

( Marble Slab) 

"Born at Guildford, Surrey ; died 20th August 1875, at sea, on board her Majesty's ship Pearl, from arrow wounds received on 12th August of the same year, at Carlisle Bay, in the Island of Santa Cruz, which he was visiting for the purpose of establishing friendly relations with the natives, who, not knowing what they did, killed their truest friend. He sailed away to die, refusing to allow a single life to be taken in retaliation. "

In his last days God was abundantly glorified, having revealed Himself to his servant in great love, his death was a triumphant victory.

Left Side Inscription

 On either side of him rests a seaman who died in the same manner.

Back Inscription

 Erected by his wife, and the officers and crew of the H.M.S Pearl

Source: MA
Monument details supplied by Monument Australia - www.monumentaustralia.org.au
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