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Helicopter Flood Memorial
Helicopter Flood Memorial

Photographs supplied by Diane Watson

An Iroquois helicopter, which was a gift from the Australian Government, commemorates the evacuation of 2000 people from the town in 1990 due to rising flood waters.

The helicopter, a symbol of courage, played a vital role in the Vietnam War Battle of Long Tan, and stood as a static display adjacent to the Railway Station until 21 May 2011. It has now been transported to Caloundra to be restored and placed on display. Caloundra RSL kindly restored and transported a replacement Iroquois to the town. A new levee, one metre higher than the 1990 flood level now protects the town and its people.

In April 1990, unusually heavy rains caused major flooding in the town, despite a massive effort by local people to raise the levee walls using sandbags. With the town almost completely flooded, all the residents had to be evacuated by helicopter from the railway station, the highest point of the town, which was not flooded. Air Force helicopters, TV news helicopters and private helicopters all co-operated in the airlift. The total damage amounted to $50 million. 

Location

Address:Pangee Street, Vanges Park, Nyngan, 2825
State:NSW
Area:AUS
GPS Coordinates:Lat: -31.563052
Long: 147.196639
Note: GPS Coordinates are approximate.
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Details

Monument Type:Technology
Monument Theme:Disaster
Sub-Theme:Flood
Approx. Event Start Date:1990
Approx. Event End Date:1990

Dedication

Actual Monument Dedication Date:Saturday 4th April, 1992
Front Inscription

THIS IROQUOIS HELICOPTER
Presented To The People Of
            Nyngan
By The Federal Government
To Commemorate The Evacuation Of
             Nyngan
      On 24th April 1990
WAS UNVEILED BY HIS EXCELLENCY
REAR ADMIRAL PETER SINCLAIR A.O.
   Governor Of New South Wales
     On The 4th April 1992

Source: MA
Monument details supplied by Monument Australia - www.monumentaustralia.org.au
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